Primitive Reflex Integration for Successful Learning and Development: Part 2 (Palmer Grasp Reflex)

Primitive Reflex Integration for Successful Learning and Development: Part 2 (Palmer Grasp Reflex)

If your child presents with three or more of the following symptoms, make an appointment for an occupational therapy evaluation.

  • Difficulty with fine motor skills
  • Sticks out tongue while writing
  • Poor manual dexterity
  • Messy handwriting
  • Poor pincer grip between thumb and forefinger
  • Immature pencil grip
  • Over sensitivity to touch on the palms
  • Poor spoon, fork and knife grasp
  • Difficulty with cup handles

The above symptoms are indications of a retained Palmer grasp primitive reflex.

What are Primitive Reflexes?

Primitive Reflexes are automatic movements that begin to occur in utero and last through the early months of a child’s postnatal life. With typical development, the nervous system matures and naturally replaces the primitive reflexes (survival reflexes) with higher level postural reflexes (reflexes required for balance, coordination, and sensory motor development). Retained primitive reflexes can lead to developmental delays related to ADHD, sensory processing disorder, autism, and many other learning disabilities.

Palmer Grasp Reflex

The automatic flexing of fingers to grab an object. This reflex is stimulated when an object is placed into a baby’s palm. This reflex emerges 11 weeks in utero, and is typically inhibited by 5 months of age.

A retained Palmer grasp reflex is 1 of 6 primitive reflexes treated by the occupational therapy team at Team 4 Kids.

See link below for more information on Primitive Reflexes:palmer-reflex

http://suehyland.co.uk/ond/primitive-reflexes/

Melissa – Occupational Therapy Team